Weak Affinity Chromatography

When developing new pharmaceuticals one needs to know which proteins/enzymes are involved in the processes causing the disease. With this knowledge the pharmaceutical chemist tries to design a molecule...

Biochemical Monitoring

Our business area biochemical monitoring works to develop products or methods that enables continuous or intermittent biochemical monitoring of changes of different analytes in different medical conditions...

Transientic Interactions

Transientic Interactions AB develops innovative products in Life Science. Our main area is in biochemical transient interactions, from which we get our name. At the moment we are focusing on introducing...

Testimony from one of our customers:

In the search for an effective solution to screen larger fragment libraries using affinity-based methods, we started to collaborate with Transientic Interactions AB, a company that recently introduced Weak Affinity Chromatography (WAC) as means to address that need.

Right from the start, Transientic Interactions AB, impressed us with their efficient, professional manner – an approach that not only inspired confidence, but generated the results we were looking for.

They were able to provide us with primary screening data with an impressive turn-around time from assay development to data delivery, which confirms to us that we found an efficient partner for fragment screening with WAC.

Stefan Geschwindner, Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca R&D

Fragment Based Drug Discovery is a new approach for Drug Discovery and Development by which fragment screening is performed to find new interesting fragments that can be developed into lead molecules. Recent research at Linnaeus University has been performed with the purpose to develop WACTM as a new technique for this particular application. WACTM represents an affordable, accessible and reliable fragment screening technique that requires standard HPLC equipment.

When new pharmaceuticals are developed, knowing which proteins/enzymes that are involved in the process causing the disease is essential. With this knowledge the pharmaceutical chemist tries to design a molecule that can regulate the activity of the disease related proteins (target proteins), so that the symptoms of the illness are reduced or eliminated.

A relatively new way of developing pharmaceuticals is to use so called fragment based screening. This technology depends on having a library of many small molecules (fragments) that represent a broad selection of chemical structures. By searching through (screening) the fragment-library for molecules that bind to a target protein one can find structures that then are combined or developed to drug candidates.

Due to their modest size, the fragments often bind with low affinity with KD values in the mM-µM range. It is therefore necessary to use methods that are sensitive enough to detect these weak bonds between the fragment molecule and the target proteins during fragment screening. It is common to use a combination of techniques to find useful fragments. New fragment screening methods that can complement the existing ones are of great interest.

The objective of Dr Minh-Dao Duong-Thi’s and Dr Elinor Meiby’s recently published doctoral dissertations at the Linnaeus University in Kalmar was to introduce the technology Weak Affinity Chromatography (WAC) in Drug Discovery and Development for fragment screening and assessment of progressive fragments.

WAC is a method based on HPLC where the target protein is immobilized onto the support material of a column. While passing through the column, the molecules that do not bind to the target protein in the column pass quickly through the column while the molecules that bind to it will be delayed. From this delay the affinity (kD) can be determined. This technology has considerable advantages; it is fast and robust, it can be performed on mixtures of molecules such as stereoisomers and one can get information about affinity from a single sample of the analyte even with very weak binding in the mM range.

Links

Minh-Dao’s complete doctoral dissertation.

Elinor’s complete disertation.

Open access article: Fragment Screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

Our business area biochemical monitoring works to develop products or methods that enables continuous or intermittent biochemical monitoring of changes of different analytes in different medical conditions and/or medical treatment.

One example is to monitor the levels of L-Dopa in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. With the information that is obtained, drugs can be in a better way be discontinued and may thus reduce discomfort and increase the quality of life for the patients. The partly-owned firm L-Dopa Monitoring AB develops in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies this application.

Transientic Interactions AB develops innovative products in Life Science. Our main area is in biochemical transient interactions, from which we get our name.

At the moment we are focusing on introducing WAC (Weak Affinity Chromatography) for drug development. WAC is a novel and patent pending method for affinity-screening, with it our customers can develop new pharmaceuticals faster.

Transientic Interactions has the commercial rights for WAC world wide. Our knowledge is unique due to the development effort that has been carried out in collaboration with the Linnaeus University, AstraZeneca and Agilent Technologies.

Professor Sten Ohlson and Lennart Pedersen founded Transientic Interactions 2004. The technology is based upon Sten Ohlson’s work in weak or transient interactions that has been carried out for decades.

During the year we have also been working in a new business area – biochemical monitoring. We have also founded L-Dopa Monitoring AB together with specialists and firms in the field of Parkinson’s disease. Transientic Interactions are part-owners of L-Dopa Monitoring AB.

Sten Ohlson is professor and chair of applied biochemistry (biotechnology) at the Linnaeus University in Sweden. Currently he is the Lee Wee Nam visiting professor at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. He is the father of WAC (affinity LC/MS) screening technology for fragment-based lead discovery. His major research interests are focused to transient biological interactions in the areas of drug discovery, clinical diagnostics and separation technologies. Recently he has devoted major efforts to demonstrate the potential of the transient drug. He has also spent many years in the life-science industry as an entrepreneur and director of R&D and he has co-founded four companies including Transientic Interactions AB within the area of life-science/biotechnology.

In June 2017, Professor Sten Ohlson was awarded the prestigious The International Society for Molecular Recognition (ISMR) Pierce prize for "Outstanding contributions to the field of affinity technology". The prize was awarded at a ceremony at the conference Affinity 2017 in Paris where he also gave a plenary lecture on “The Strength of Weak Affinity Interactions” in connection with the award ceremony.